Island reflections by Heather Currie

Holidays are for fun, relaxation, recharging the batteries, catching up, all things good. But holidays also give time to think and reflect and often holiday situations trigger a thought which may have relevance to a work situation. I think that’s ok, I don’t think I’m pathologically workaholic. I enjoy having time to reflect, whether that be on holiday or other.

heather-jettyA recent holiday in the beautiful west coast, triggered reflection on how we respond to patient’s needs, and perhaps how we could do better.

On the west coast of Mull is a ferry which goes to the tiny island of Ulva. While waiting to take a boat trip out to the Treshnish Isles (home of a huge colony of wonderful puffins), I noticed the sign indicating how to summon the ferry. No regular routine service, just a board with a moveable cover. Move the cover, red board shows, ferryman on Ulva sees red board, ferry sets out. Simples.. Ferry there when needed and when summoned. Receptive and responsive. It made me think whether or not we are receptive and responsive to our patients’ needs and what about the needs of the relatives?  A few examples make me think perhaps not enough?

heather-both-2

In recent times my mother in law sadly suffered from a stroke and was in an acute hospital for several months before being transferred to a Rehab unit and subsequently a nursing home. Being a patient is always a humbling and learning experience, as is being a relative and visitor of a patient. On one visit I was concerned that her finger nails were quite long and dirty. “Mum” could not speak at this stage but since she was always very particular about her appearance, I knew that this would cause her distress and asked the nurse in charge if it was at all possible, please please, thank-you so much…(it felt like asking for anything was a major challenge) could her nails be cut. To my surprise and disappointment, I was told that this was not possible since only two nurses on the ward had had the “training” and when they were on duty it was unlikely that they would have time. Receptive and responsive or too rigidly bound up in rules and protocols of questionable evidence base that basic needs are not met? Thereafter we took it upon ourselves to cut the nails ourselves!

I was very reassured on return to DGRI that this would not happen here and strongly believe that we are more receptive and responsive, but could we do better?

Recently, one of our gynaecology patients who had been diagnosed with a terminal condition was moved between wards four times as her condition deteriorated. As long as her medical and nursing needs were being met, was it fair on her at this sad stage to have so many moves? Did we really think about what was best for her and her family and were we receptive to their needs?

In outpatients, how often do we ask patients to return for a “routine” appointment when they may not need to be seen in six months time, but have problems at a later date? Could we instead be able to respond to their needs and see them or even make telephone contact when really needed?

An elderly gentleman understandably complained because he spent a whole day travelling from the west of the region to Dumfries by patient transport, for a ten minute outpatient appointment to be given the result of a scan. In his own words, “he was not told anything that could not have been told by telephone”.

What routine investigations do we carry out that are of limited clinical benefit, often subjecting patients to yet further unnecessary investigations because of slight irrelevant abnormalities?

When questioning our practice, let’s also be prepared to be curious about that of others in hospitals to which we refer—recently a patient was referred to Glasgow for a gynaecological procedure. The procedure went well but the patient subsequently contacted me concerned that she had been asked to return to Glasgow for a follow up discussion. She wondered if a phone call would be possible in view of the huge inconvenience that this appointment would cause. I wrote to the consultant and asked if this would be possible. His rapid response was enlightening and reassuring: he had always brought patients back to a clinic as routine practice and never considered an alternative. He promised that from then on he would offer all such patients a telephone follow up instead.

Let’s use common sense and be prepared to challenge and bend the rules. Remember the ferry. While we do not have a “ferryman” waiting to respond at all times, we could consider the 4 “Rs”and be –

Responsive not Rigid,

Receptive not Routine.

Heather Currie is an Associate Specialist Gynaecologist and Clinical Director for Women and Sexual Health at NHS Dumfries & Galloway 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 thoughts on “Island reflections by Heather Currie

  1. Brilliant blog! Although I feel that the Third Sector has a far more flexible approach towards the four ‘R’s than other sectors. This is most definately the way forward – ensuring the needs of the patient are met whilst also saving money in certain areas such as the follow-up appointments.

  2. Although the musings of a retiree returning to the same place of work,especially if they have the flavour of preaching in it,should be taken with a large pinch of salt;after reading Dr Curries thought provoking blog, I can not help but humbly share my views.

    The reason we treat others,in this case patients and their relatives,without thinking of the four Rs is because we think they are OTHER.If in every interaction we think of others as our selves then our actions would never be harmful.All of us want the best for our selves.

    So before we arrange a followup,investigation,moving patients from ward to ward etc. please visualise that all that is happening to you or your relative.This simple exercise will help us act with thoughtfulness rather than routinely.

  3. Hi Heather – great blog. Unfortunately we do have a ‘nail related’ problem in DGRI. A significant number of our NOF patients have neglected toe nails usually because they are frail and elderly and no longer have the flexibility to care for their nails. In the ward their feet are often exposed and I feel they looked uncared for with long, thick, often curled toenails. I contacted podiatry who said families should do nail-care or they are in the process of training ward staff to do it. Many of our patients have no family or they are equally frail. Ward 16 has no staff trained in nail-care so it just doesn’t get done. I’m planning to get the training myself (hopefully with some of our HCAs) but finding it difficult to pin down a suitable date but to be honest, I think the neglect of this basic facet of care isn’t right – things such as this show real care and attention to the patient as a human being. Thanks for reminding me to keep on ‘going on’ about this!

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